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Rack Your Brains and Help! /73

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains and Help! /73
Message de here4u posté le 26-06-2020 à 23:48:51 (S | E | F)
Hello, Dear Workers!

Here is your new RYB! I'm sure your brains need racking, paralysed as they may be by the current stifling heat... In Paris, pollution has been back for several days, already...

My student has tried to deal with an energising habit which we may have to imitate... He'll show you a video of it when the correction is online on Friday, July 10th. This exercise is a and I forgot to tell you that 20 mistakes have been left. Can you help him, please? I'm sure you'll find them...

The exercise that moves Japan. 20 mistakes are hidden in this text...
Known by heart along the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcasted daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without the need for any equipement. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, shoulder wide apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the elders to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle rising of the arms on the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the breasts and are swung down like pendulae until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweet. By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The two last movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: tubercolosis was common and for life assurers business was hard. By mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcasted every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children attending school on time, rather than sleeping late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too awoken to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily diet which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

Hum... Not very easy, I'm afraid... I give you a double share of THE FORCE...


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de magie8, postée le 28-06-2020 à 18:55:50 (S | E)
mistakes are hidden in this text... BONJOUR HEUREUSE DE RETROUVER TOUS LES FAMILIERS AU COMPLET ET DES NOUVEAUX ARRIVES .READY TO CORRECT
The exercise that moves Japan.
Known by heart ACROSS the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine BROADCASTING daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools EVERY-DAY – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without the need for any EQUIPMENT . The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS wide apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the YOUTHS and the elders to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with A gentle rising of the arms on the head. In movement two, arms start CROSSING across the breasts and are swung down like PENDULUM until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle BEND of the knees – hardly enough to break SWEAT . By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with THE music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The two last movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life ASSURANCE BUSINESS was hard. By THE MIDDLE OF THE 20TH CENTURY -, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – HAVE performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been BROADCASTING every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in NEIGHBORHOOD groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating FROM 1920 designed to get children attending school on time, rather than sleeping late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too awoken to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in MUSCLES INJURIES
in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily diet which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

Hum... Not very easy, I'm afraid... I give you a double share of THE FORCE...DESOLEE JE METS EN CORRECTION UN TRAVAIL PAS TERMINE je n ai pas trouvé les fautes dans le dernier paragraphe cela me prend trop de temps j 'ai trop à faire et trop de choses à penser dans la tête BON COURAGE A TOUS
-------------------
Modifié par magie8 le 04-07-2020 08:29



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de taiji43, postée le 30-06-2020 à 18:05:31 (S | E)
DEAR HERE4U
I have used my dictionary ans my eyes to double-check the words and verbs or expressions sounding out of tune; howeverI am pleased to do it, but you don't have to be in hurry to do anything else!

READY TO BE CORRECTED

The exercise that or WHICH moves Japan

Known by heart ACCROSS the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine BROADCAST (diffusé du verbe broadcast ) daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without NEEDING any EQUIPMENT. The three-minute exercise mostly REQUIRE planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS WIDTH -apart = pieds écartéz à la LARGEUR des épaules

This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the YOUTH and the ELDERLY( les personnes agées) to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle RAISING (eyes, arm, leg) of the arms ABOVE(au dessus) the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across( the BREAST Or CHEST = poitrine) and are swung down like pendulae???PENDULUM until they finish outstretched either side.

/// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle bob????? of the knees – hardly enough to break SWEAT (sueur pas sucrerie). By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with THe (cette musique précise)music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The LAST TWO movements repeat steps one and two to allow FOR some time (pour quelques temps) or AT TIMES (par instants to cool down.

Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life insurers business was hard. By THe mid-20TH CENTURY, rajio-taiso was launched en masse

To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – WERE USED TO PERFORMING the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been BROADCAST every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the MOST militaristic movements HAVE changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age.

///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children TO ATTEND school on time, rather than SLEEP late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get children TO PERFORM «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped

./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too AWAKE to go back While or WHEREAS (alors que) exercise is linked to an increase in (OK) muscle INJURIES in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence . A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that SPEED WALKING or FAST WALK (marche rapide) and time taken to stand out(s'élever contre AGAINST) a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging = AGEAING (OK) in older people is less clear. While or WHEREAS there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Or MISENDERSTOOD Certainly, for THE followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick.(faire l'affaire )As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily REGIMEN which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for COMING generation. /// END of THE TEXT ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de joe39, postée le 30-06-2020 à 19:21:33 (S | E)
Hello, dear here4u,
After some hard sessions of brain calisthenics,
I’m sending you my correction,
ready to be checked.
20 mistakes.
The exercise that moves Japan. 20 mistakes are hidden in this text...
Known by heart along generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine DAILY BROADCASTED on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages USING ONLY THE MOMENTUM - 1 and weight of your own body without the need for any EQUIPMENT - 2. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS WIDTH - 3 apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the ELDERLY - 4 to do from behind DESKS - 5, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle rising of the arms ABOVE - 6 the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the BREAST - 7 and are swung down like PENDULUMS or PENDULA - 8 until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE ///
This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a SWEAT - 9. /By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The LAST TWO - 10 movements repeat steps one and two to allow FOR -11 some time to cool down.


Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS - 12
was common and for life INSURERS - 13 business was hard./ By mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began
. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcasted every day, stopping only briefly after (the - 14 ) WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO ///

If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards ARE - 15 stamped after a student TAKES – 16 part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card.

The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children attending school on time, rather than SLEEP - 18 late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE ///

With their blood pumping, the children were too AWAKE - 19 to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. /While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood./

/Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily REGIMEN –20 which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

I thank you very much and hope you have a pleasant evening.
So long.
Joe39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de maxwell, postée le 04-07-2020 à 08:50:02 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED

Hello Here4U and everyone
Not very easy? Quite hard and tricky, you mean! a exercise! But the topic was most interesting!

Help My Student:

Known by heart along the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcasted daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools EVERY day – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the moment and weight of your own body without the need for any EQUIPMENT. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet ON one spot, shoulder WIDTH apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the elders to do from behind offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with A gentle rising of the arms OVER the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the breasts and are swung down like PENDULUMS until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE ///

This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a SWEAT. By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The last TWO movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life INSURERS, business was hard. By THE mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets EVERY morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcasted every day, stopping only briefly after [] WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO ///

If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as A child, many will reply that they WERE synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children TO ATTEND school on time, rather than SLEEP late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Some children then SUPPOSEDLY returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children TO PERFORM «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE ///


With their blood pumping, the children were too AWAKE to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found OUT that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the FRAILEST individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for THE followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily DISCIPLINE which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de maya92, postée le 04-07-2020 à 15:56:25 (S | E)
hello Here4u,

The exercise that moves Japan. 20 mistakes are hidden in this text…

Known by heart along the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcasted daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools every day – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the MOVEMENT and weight of your own body without the need OF any EQUIPMENT. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, SHOULDERS wide apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the ELDERLY to do from behind offices, in groups, IN the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle rising of the arms ABOVE the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the breast and are swung down like A PENDULUM until they finish outstretched ON BOTH SIDES. /// END of PART ONE ///
This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a SWEAT. By movement 11, exercises move on to modest START jumps in time with THE music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The LAST TWO movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life INSURANCE business was hard. By THE mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal serviceS – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets EVERY morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been BROADCAST every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO ///
If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays CHILDREN, many will reply that they are SYMPATHETIC with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s INTENDED to get THE children TO ATTEND school on time, rather than SLEEP late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE ///
With their blood pumping, the children were too AWAKE to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle INJURIES in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to GET UP FROM a chair can be positively improved in even the FRAILEST individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for THE followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily SYSTEM which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

Thank u for this 6 stars exercise … Have a nice sunny week-end -



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de here4u, postée le 04-07-2020 à 17:18:07 (S | E)


Je dis 3 , maxwell dit 4 et maya 6 ... Qui dit mieux ?

Beau sujet, quand même ... et quand vous verrez la vidéo ...



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de alpiem, postée le 04-07-2020 à 19:44:17 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 READY NOW
HELLO GLAD TO SEE YOU ALL.

My student has tried to deal with an energising habit which we may have to imitate... He'll show you a video of it when the correction is online on Friday, July 10th. This exercise is a and I forgot to tell you that 20 mistakes have been left. Can you help him, please? I'm sure you'll find them...

The exercise that moves Japan.
Known by heart along the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcasted daily on Japan’s national radioS, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all THE generations of Japanese people.

Rajio taiso encourages only the MOMENTUM and weight of your own body without the need OF any equipement. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, LEGS wide apart.

This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and elders to do from behind THEIR offices, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere.

It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with A gentle rising of the arms ABOVE the head. In movement two, arms STARTING TO CROSS OVER the breasts and BEING swung down like A PENDULUM until they finished outstretched ON either side/// END of PART ONE /// .


This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweet.
By movement 11, exercises move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets ON.

The two last movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: tubercolosis was common and for life INSURERS business was hard. By mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse.

To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines ALONG the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began.

Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcasted every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school FOR children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO //

If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as A child, many will reply that they WERE synonymous WITH the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups.

The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for THE children who completed a perfect card.

The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children TO ATTEND school on time, rather than sleeping late.

Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps.

Someone came up with a plan to get the children PERFORM «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE ///

With their blood pumping, the children were too awoken to go back to bed.
While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence.

A review of studies on exercise PLANNED for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear.

While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood.

Certainly, for followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery RYTHME, they remain a society-wide daily diet which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de here4u, postée le 08-07-2020 à 22:41:32 (S | E)
Hello!

Je commence à poster vos corrections ... Il reste encore du temps pour les hésitants ...



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de chocolatcitron, postée le 09-07-2020 à 23:41:17 (S | E)
Rack Your Brains and Help!- 73
Message de here4u posté le 26-06-2020 à 23:48:51 (S | E | F) Friday, July 10th
Hello my dear Here4u ! Thanks ! This one was too long and quite tricky too, but I didn’t give up and really tried to do my best.

Hi Dear hard workers!

FINISHED !

Here is my work:

My student has tried to deal with an energising habit which we may have to imitate... He'll show you a video of it. 20 mistakes are hidden in this text...

The exercise that moves Japan.

Known by heart 1 ACROSS the generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine 2 BROADCAST daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools everyday – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people.
Rajio taiso encourages 3 USING only the 4 MOMENTUM and weight of your own body without the need for any 5 EQUIPMENT. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, shoulder wide apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the elders to do from behind 6 THEIR 7 DESKS, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere.
It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle 8 RAISING of the arms 9 ABOVE the head. In movement two, arms start crossed across the breasts and are swung down like 10 PENDULUMS until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE ///

This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweet. By movement 11, 11 EXERCISERS move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The 12 LAST TWO movements repeat steps one and two to allow 13 FOR some time to cool down.
Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: 14 TUBERCULOSIS was common and for life 15 INSURERS business was hard. By 16 THE mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been 2 bis BROADCAST every day, stopping only briefly after the WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age.
///END of PART TWO ///

If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as 17 A child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children attending (to get + ing = commencer à faire qqch.) school on time, rather than sleeping late. Stamps were first given out at «hayaokikai» or «early-riser meetings» to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to get the children performing «rajio taiso» at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE ///

With their blood pumping, the children were too 18 AWAKE to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for 19 THE followers of "rajio taiso", the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery 20 RHYTHM, they remain a society-wide daily diet which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///


My translation of the whole text:
L’exercice qui fait bouger le Japon.

Enchaînement appris par cœur, toutes générations confondues, cet enchaînement typiquement japonais a une origine surprenante : « Rajio taiso », ou radio calisthenics (= "Bonne technique" si on se réfère aux mots grecs contenus dans "kalistechnics" avec kali = beau, bon), est un court exercice diffusé quotidiennement sur la radio nationale japonaise, diffusé sur YouTube, suivi dans les parcs et les écoles tous les jours – parfois plusieurs fois par jour – par toutes les générations de Japonais.
Rajio taiso encourage à utiliser uniquement l’élan et le poids de votre propre corps sans avoir besoin d’équipement. L’exercice de trois minutes nécessite surtout de planter vos pieds en un seul endroit, épaules écartées. Cela le rend idéal pour les employés de bureau, les écoliers, les jeunes et les personnes âgées pour le pratiquer derrière le bureau, en groupe, au parc, à la maison - n’importe où.
Il est composé de 13 mouvements et commence par une légère levée des bras au-dessus de la tête. Dans le mouvement deux, les bras commencent croisés sur la poitrine et sont balancés vers le bas comme des pendules jusqu’à ce qu’ils finissent tendus de chaque côté.///1ère partie///

Ceci est accompagné d’une douce impulsion des genoux – à peine assez pour prendre une suée.
Avec le mouvement 11, les gymnastes font des petits sauts modestes dans le rythme de la musique. C’est à peu près aussi rigoureux que la routine obtient. Les deux derniers mouvements répètent les étapes une et deux pour prévoir le temps de se refroidir un peu.
L’espérance de vie moyenne en 1920 était de 42 ans au Japon : la tuberculose était courante et pour les assureurs-vie, les affaires étaient difficiles.
Au milieu des années 20, rajio taiso a été lancé en masse. Pour enseigner l’enchaînement, les travailleurs nationaux du service postal – tous les 20 000 d’entre eux – ont effectué les prestations dans les rues chaque matin, arrêtant leurs tournées au début de l’émission de radio. Depuis lors, rajio taiso a été diffusé tous les jours, s’arrêtant seulement brièvement après la Seconde Guerre mondiale pour changer certains des mouvements les plus militaristes. Rajio Taisio est enseigné aux enfants dans les écoles depuis leur plus jeune âge.///2ème partie///

Si vous demandez à un Japonais adulte comment ils ont passé leurs vacances d’été en tant qu’enfant, beaucoup répondront que leur enfance est synonyme de la routine.
Levés de bonne heure, carte de présence en main, les enfants terminaient les enchaînements dans les groupes du voisinage. Les cartes étaient estampillées après qu’un étudiant ait participé à l’un des enchaînements très matinaux, avec des prix remis pour les enfants qui remplissaient une carte parfaite.
Les cartes elles-mêmes provenaient d’une autre initiative datant également des années 1920 visant à amener les enfants à aller à l’école à l’heure, plutôt que de faire la grasse matinée. Les timbres ont d’abord été donnés à « hayaokikai », ou « réunions de matinaux », pour prouver que les élèves avaient fréquenté l’école le matin. Apparemment, certains enfants sont ensuite retournés au lit après avoir récupéré leurs timbres. Quelqu’un élabora un plan pour que les enfants exécutèrent rajio taiso à ces réunions tôt le matin, après quoi ils avaient leurs cartes estampillées./// 3ème partie///

Avec leur sang remis en circulation, les enfants étaient trop réveillés pour retourner au lit.
Alors que l’exercice est lié à une augmentation des blessures musculaires chez les personnes âgées, l’enchaînements d’exercices plus doux peut avoir un impact très positif sur leur indépendance. Une conclusion sur les études au sujet d’exercices pour les personnes âgées a affirmé que la vitesse de marche et le temps pris pour se lever d’une chaise peut être positivement amélioré même chez les personnes les plus fragiles avec des étirements légers.
Cependant, le lien entre l’exercice et le vieillissement mental chez les personnes âgées est moins clair. Bien qu’il existe beaucoup de preuves encourageantes liant l’exercice à la protection contre le déclin cognitif, le mécanisme par lequel cela se produit est mal compris.
Certes, pour les adeptes de rajio taiso, les étirements quotidiens semblent faire l’affaire. Aussi familiers qu’une comptine, ils restent un exercice quotidien à l’échelle de la société qui continuera sûrement à égayer les matins des gens pour les générations à venir.///Fin du texte///


My explanations:
1 along signifie le long de, across = à travers
2 Ho !!!, broadcast garde les mêmes formes à l’infinitif, au prétérit et participe passé ! Broadcast, broadcast, broadcast, diffuser.
3 USING = l’usage.
4 moment = instant ; momentum = élan.
5 EQUIPMENT = orthographe.
6 Their desk
7 = DESKS (office = bureau en tant que salle ; desk, bureau en tant que meuble
8 = rise = se lever ; to raise = lever
9 ABOVE (on = sur = posées sur ; above =au-dessus de)
10 pendulae n’existerait pas dans word reference ; pendulum = balancier.
11 EXERCISERS = exercises = exercices ; exercisers = gymnastes, sportifs ; exécutants de pratique sportive.
12 LAST TWO = last two = les deux derniers…
13 FOR= allow = permettre ; allow for = prévoir, compter du temps.
14 TUBERCULOSIS = orthographe
15 INSURERS = vocabulaire.
By 16 THE (précision) mid-20s
2 bis BROADCAST (partie 3)
17 A child = en tant qu’enfant, du temps où il était enfant.
18 AWOKEN = participe passé ; AWAKE = adjectif qualificatif.
19 = for THE followers of = précision… donc il faut « the »
20 = rhyme = poème vers, RHYTHM = répétition de qqch.

I translated the whole text, if you need for your follow up work, it’s not perfect, but it’s done!!! Here is the double force for your marking.
I'll take the first part, if mine is not perfect
!


Lien internet


Lien internet


Without your balance safe, you can't do it : it's really impossible.
Quand ton équilibre est beaucoup trop défaillant, tu ne peux pas le faire : c'est vraiment impossible.

Take care of yourself! Have a very sweet Week!
See you soon…



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de here4u, postée le 10-07-2020 à 23:25:48 (S | E)
Hello, Dear Hardworkers,

Ce texte vous a donné bien du fil à retordre ... et c'était normal ! Je vous avais prévenus ... Il n'était pas "facile" ... Certains l'ont même trouvé "diabolique" ... peut-être pas, quand même ...

Comme d'habitude, j'ai besoin de volontaires pour le Follow-up work ... (Travail non urgent !) Choco nous a préparé son travail de traduction Choco, mais vous savez que nous aimons bien avoir plusieurs suggestions ... merci aux volontaires ...

The exercise that moves Japan. Known by heart across generations(1), this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcast (2) daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools every day (3)– sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the momentum (4) and weight of your own body without the need for any equipement. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, shoulder-width apart (5). This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the elderly (6) to do from behind desks(7), in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle raising (8)of the arms above (9) the head.In movement two, arms start crossed across the chest(10) and are swung down like pendulums (11) until they finish outstretched either side. /// END of PART ONE /// This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweat (12). By movement 11, exercisers (13) move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The last two (14) movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: tuberculosis was common and for life insurers (15) business was hard. By the (16) mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcast every day, stopping only briefly after WWII (*)to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age. ///END of PART TWO /// If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as a child(17), many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children to attend(18) school on time, rather than sleep late. Stamps were first given out at « hayaokikai » or « early-riser meetings » to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to make the children perform (19)« rajio taiso » at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped./// END of PART THREE /// With their blood pumping, the children were too awake(20) to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for followers of rajio taiso, the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily regimen** which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come. /// END of THE TEXT ///

Admirez la discipline ... une véritable chorégraphie ... Jambes bien tendues ... Sourire aux lèvres et tellement concentrés ... Je trouve ceci impressionnant ! ( Attention ! Il ne s’agit pas seulement de regarder les 7 tableaux sur 10 -, mais d'aller jusqu'au bout et de regarder la vidéo qui est édifiante ....)


Lien internet


Attention ! Il y avait quelques « typos » dans le texte …. qui n’étaient absolument pas des fautes faites par mon élève …

Ses erreurs :
(1) Known by heart along the generations=> Known by heart across generations ; il ne s’agit certes pas de générations particulières, mais de TOUTES LES GÉNÉRATIONS depuis sa création.
(2) routine broadcasted daily; routine broadcast daily! Là, Vous EXAGÉREZ … ; et beaucoup (trop !) d’entre vous se sont fait prendre à ce piège grossier … To cast, I cast, cast => to broadcast, I broadcast, broadcast.
(3) everyday –Différence entre « everyday » et « every day » Lien internet

(4) encourages only the momentum and weight of your own body; là aussi, le piège était un peu gros et pourtant … Mon élève avait confondu « moment » et « momentum » ! Rien à voir ! Lien internet

(5) shoulder wide apart=> shoulder-width apart= apart (separated) / shoulder-width= as wide as shoulders = with your feet shoulder-width apart
(6) Vous avez été un peu durs avec nos « elders » : les anciens, les aieux, les « sages ». Ne pas confondre avec « the elderly » : Lien internet
qui sont plus « jeunes » !
(7) « office » = le bureau, la pièce ; « desk » = le meuble devant lequel on s’assied.
(8) with gentle rising of the arms on the head. => with gentle raising of the arms above the head. Ne pas confondre : to rise, I rose, risen : Lien internet
et to raise: (verbe régulier) et qui a une multitude des sens très variés ….
(9) On= sur /// above= au dessus de
(10) Ne pas confondre « breasts », la poitrine, les seins Lien internet
) (et « chest » plutôt pour les hommes) Lien internet

(11) a pendulum=> pendulums pluriel régulier.
(12) … to break a sweat= être en sueur, se mettre à transpirer. Ne pas confondre « sweet [i :] »= doux, un bonbon. ET « sweat [e] » => a sweat shirt…
(13) To exercise= faire du sport=> an exercise= un exercice sportif=> an exerciser= une personne qui fait de l’exercice.
(14) The last two movements: attention à la place de « last » et « first »=> the first five minutes/ the last ten pages/ etc.
(15) a life insurance=> a life insurer. => to insure=> to have an insurance=> the Insurance Company.
* Attention ! Ne pas mélanger deux formulations du même événement : The Second World War /// WWII= World War 2.
(16) the mid-20s = la moitié des années 20 ! (1925 !) beaucoup ont pensé au 20è siècle … Ce n’était pas le problème !
(17) … how they spent their summer holidays as a child= when they were kids= when the person was a child…
(18) (19) plan to get the children attending=> to make the children attend/ /

Encore BRAVO à vous tous !




Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de maxwell, postée le 13-07-2020 à 20:21:16 (S | E)
FINISHED
Hello
I'll take part II.


This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweat. By movement 11, exercisers move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The last two movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: tuberculosis was common and for life insurers business was hard. By the mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcast every day, stopping only briefly after WWII to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age.

Cela s'accompagne d'un léger balancement des genoux, à peine suffisant pour faire transpirer. Au mouvement 11, les sportifs passent à de modestes sauts en étoile en rythme avec la musique. C'est à peu près tout ce qu'il y aura de rigoureux dans la routine. Les deux derniers mouvements répètent les étapes 1 et 2 pour laisser un peu de temps pour récupérer. L'espérance de vie moyenne en 1920 était de 42 ans au Japon : la tuberculose était courante et pour les assureurs vie, les affaires étaient difficiles. Au milieu des années 20, le rajio-taiso fut lancé en masse. Pour enseigner les routines, les travailleurs du service postal national - tous les 20 000 - exécutèrent les routines dans les rues chaque matin, faisant une pause dans leurs tournées au démarrage de l'émission radio. Depuis lors, le rajio-taiso a été diffusé tous les jours, ne s'arrêtant que brièvement après la 2ème guerre mondiale pour faire changer quelques-uns des mouvements les plus militaristes. On inculque le rajio taiso aux écoliers dès leur plus jeune âge.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help! /73 de here4u, postée le 14-07-2020 à 15:58:24 (S | E)
Hello!

Après beaucoup de difficultés techniques, voici, comme promis le Follow-up Work de notre exercice. Un grand aux volontaires ...

The exercise that moves Japan. Known by heart across generations, this uniquely Japanese routine has a surprising origin: «Rajio taiso», or radio calisthenics, is a short exercise routine broadcast daily on Japan’s national radio, streamed on YouTube, followed in parks and schools every day – sometimes several times a day – by all generations of Japanese people. Rajio taiso encourages only the momentum and weight of your own body without the need for any equipement. The three-minute exercise mostly requires planting your feet in one spot, shoulder-width apart. This makes it ideal for office workers, school children, the young and the elderly to do from behind desks, in groups, at the park, at home, anywhere. It’s made up of 13 movements and begins with gentle raising of the arms above the head.In movement two, arms start crossed across the chest and are swung down like pendulums until they finish outstretched either side.


L'exercice qui fait bouger le Japon.
(Enchaînement * appris par cœur, toutes générations confondues (Bonne idée !).) Connu par cœur, par toutes les générations confondues, ce enchaînement rituel typiquement japonais a une origine surprenante : « Rajio taiso »,(= "La Bonne technique") la Callisthénie à la radio, est un court exercice diffusé quotidiennement sur la radio nationale japonaise, regardé sur YouTube, suivi dans les parcs, les écoles tous les jours – parfois plusieurs fois par jour – par toutes les générations de Japonais.
"Rajio taiso" encourage à utiliser uniquement l’élan et le poids de votre propre corps sans avoir besoin d’aucun équipement. L’exercice de trois minutes nécessite surtout de bien vous "planter" les pieds, écartés de la largeur de vos épaules, épaules écartées. Cela le rend l'exercice idéal pour les employés de bureau, les écoliers, les jeunes et les personnes âgées pour le pratiquer derrière un bureau, en groupe, au parc, à la maison - n’importe où.
Il est composé de 13 mouvements et commence en levant des bras doucement au-dessus de la tête. Dans le mouvement deux, les bras commencent croisés au départ sur la poitrine, sont balancés vers le bas comme des pendules jusqu’à ce qu’ils finissent tendus de chaque côté. Bravo, Choco. A part la largeur des épaules qui n'était pas très claire, c'est PARFAIT !

* Là, tu traduis "routine" par "enchaînement", ce qui est bon, mais dévoile trop ton texte dès le début. Je pense qu'il faut garder l'idée de "routine", d'habitude", de rituel". Je choisirai ce dernier mot !


This is accompanied by a gentle bob of the knees – hardly enough to break a sweat. By movement 11, exercisers move on to modest star jumps in time with music. This is about as rigorous as the routine gets. The last two movements repeat steps one and two to allow some time to cool down. Average life expectancy in 1920 was 42 years in Japan: tuberculosis was common and for life insurers business was hard. By the (16) mid-20s, rajio-taiso was launched en masse. To teach the routines, workers at the national postal service – all 20,000 of them – performed the routines on the streets each morning, pausing their rounds as the radio show began. Since then, rajio-taiso has been broadcast every day, stopping only briefly after WWII (*)to have some of the more militaristic movements changed. Rajio taiso is instilled in school children from a young age.


- Ceci est accompagné d’une douce impulsion un léger fléchissement des genoux – à peine assez pour prendre une suée.
Avec le Parvenus au mouvement 11, les gymnastes font des petits sauts modestes "en étoile" * suivant le rythme de la musique. C’est à peu près aussi rigoureux que la routine obtient le passage le plus difficile de l'exercice. Les deux derniers mouvements répètent les étapes une et deux pour prévoir le temps de se refroidirrécupérer un peu.
L’espérance de vie moyenne en 1920 était de 42 ans au Japon : la tuberculose était courante et pour les assureurs-vie, les affaires étaient difficiles. Au milieu des années 20, le rajio taiso a été lancé en masse. Pour enseigner l’enchaînement, les travailleurs nationaux du service national de la Poste – l'ensemble des 20 000 – ont effectué les prestations mouvements dans les rues chaque matin, arrêtant leurs tournées au début de l’émission de radio. Depuis lors, le rajio taiso a été diffusé tous les jours, ne s’arrêtant brièvement qu'après la Seconde Guerre mondiale pour changer certains des mouvements les plus militaristes. Le Rajio Taisio est enseigné aux enfants dans les écoles depuis leur plus jeune âge.= Bravo, Choco ! Très bon travail !
*"saut en étoile" = bras écartés à l'oblique et jambes tendues écartées.

- Cela s'accompagne d'un léger balancement * des genoux, à peine suffisant pour faire transpirer . Au mouvement 11, les sportifs passent à de modestes sauts en étoile en rythme avec la musique. C'est à peu près tout ce qu'il y aura de rigoureux délicat/ difficile dans [u]la routine[/u] l'exercice. Les deux derniers mouvements répètent les étapes 1 et 2 pour laisser un peu de temps pour récupérer. L'espérance de vie moyenne en 1920 était de 42 ans au Japon : la tuberculose était courante et pour les assureurs vie, les affaires étaient difficiles. Au milieu des années 20, le rajio-taiso fut lancé en masse. Pour enseigner les routines, les travailleurs du service postal national - tous les 20 000 - exécutèrent les routines dans les rues chaque matin, faisant une pause dans leurs tournées au démarrage de l'émission radio. Depuis lors, le rajio-taiso a été diffusé tous les jours, ne s'arrêtant que brièvement après la 2ème guerre mondiale pour faire changer quelques-uns des mouvements les plus militaristes. On inculque le rajio taiso aux écoliers dès leur plus jeune âge.= Parfait, Maxwell ! Très bien traduit !
* balancement est le plus souvent horizontal ... Ici, le mouvement est vertical ... C'est bien un fléchissement.


If you ask a Japanese adult how they spent their summer holidays as a child, many will reply that they are synonymous with the routines: rising early, attendance card in hand, the children would complete the routines in neighbourhood groups. The cards were stamped after a student took part in one of the early morning routines, with prizes handed out for those children who completed a perfect card. The cards themselves originate from another initiative also dating from the 1920s designed to get children to attend school on time, rather than sleep late. Stamps were first given out at « hayaokikai » or « early-riser meetings » to prove that the students had attended school in the morning. Supposedly, some children then returned to bed after collecting their stamps. Someone came up with a plan to make the children perform « rajio taiso » at these early morning meetings, after which they would have their cards stamped.

Si vous demandez à des adultes Japonais comment ils ont passé leurs vacances d’été lorsqu'ils étaient petits, beaucoup répondront que leur enfance est synonyme de l'entraînement/ la gymnastique. Levés de bonne heure, carte de présence en main, les enfants terminaient les enchaînements dans les groupes du voisinage. Les cartes étaient tamponnées après qu’un étudiant ait participé à l’un des enchaînements très matinaux, avec des prix remis pour les enfants qui remplissaient une carte parfaite.
Les cartes elles-mêmes provenaient d’une autre initiative datant également des années 1920 visant à amener les enfants à aller à l’école à l’heure, plutôt que de faire la grasse matinée. Les tampons ont d’abord été donnés à « hayaokikai », ou « réunions matinales », pour prouver que les élèves avaient fréquenté l’école le matin. Apparemment, certains enfants sont ensuite retournés = retournaient ensuite au lit après avoir récupéré leur tampon. Quelqu’un élabora un plan pour que les enfants exécutent le rajio taiso à ces réunions tôt le matin, après quoi ils avaient leurs cartes estampillées. Très très bien, Choco ! Bravo !


With their blood pumping, the children were too awake(20) to go back to bed. While exercise is linked to an increase in muscle injury in older people, light exercise routines can have a very positive impact on their independence. A review of studies on exercise plans for the aged found that walking speed and time taken to stand out of a chair can be positively improved in even the most frail individuals with light stretching. However, the link between exercise and mental aging in older people is less clear. While there is a lot of encouraging evidence linking exercise with protection from cognitive decline, the mechanism by which this happens is poorly understood. Certainly, for followers of rajio taiso, the daily stretches seem to do the trick. As familiar as a nursery rhyme, they remain a society-wide daily regimen** which will surely continue to brighten people’s mornings for generations to come.

Avec le sang remis en circulation, les enfants étaient trop réveillés pour retourner au lit. Alors que l’exercice physique est lié à une augmentation des blessures musculaires chez les personnes âgées, l’enchaînement d’exercices plus doux peut avoir un impact très positif sur leur autonomie. Une conclusion sur les études au sujet de l'exercice physique pour les personnes âgées a affirmé que la vitesse de marche et le temps pris pour se lever d’une chaise peut être réellement amélioré même chez les personnes les plus fragiles en faisant des étirements doux.
Cependant, le lien entre l’exercice physique et le vieillissement mental chez les personnes âgées est moins clair. Bien qu’il existe beaucoup de preuves encourageantes reliant l’exercice physique à la protection contre le déclin cognitif, le mécanisme par lequel cela se produit est mal compris. Certes, pour les adeptes du rajio taiso, les étirements quotidiens semblent faire l’affaire. Aussi familiers qu’une comptine, ils restent un exercice quotidien à l’échelle de la société qui continuera sûrement à égayer le matin du peuple japonais pour les générations à venir.
BRAVISSIMO Choco pour ton courage et ta volonté d'accomplir cet excellent travail.

Un grand à nos deux traducteurs volontaires qui ont osé se frotter à des difficultés réelles ...

Joe39 : 28 + 27 + (7x2 + 20x1) + (4x2) + 3 = 100
Boubouille : 24 + 24 + (10x2 + 13x1) + (1x2) + 0 = 83
Feudouce : 3 + 3 + (1x2 + 2x1) + (1x2) + 0 = 12
Ours : 3 + 3 + (1x2 + 2x1) + 0 + 0 = 10

Merci à notre Chief Accountant Maxwell! Bravo aux participants !





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